Environmental News Nugget: April 24, 2012

By Austin Stahl | as506610@ohiou.edu | @AustinStahl24

In light of the university’s recent adoption of a resolution giving President Roderick McDavis the power to draft regulations for drilling companies in response to House Bill 133, I’ll start with a bit on fracking. Then, it’s on to the fascinating studies of two states — California and Ohio — that vary significantly in terms of their preparedness to deal with looming environmental issues.

1. “Will Obama’s New Rules Make Fracking Better for the Planet?”
http://motherjones.com/blue-marble/2012/04/fracking-rule-epa-obama-air-pollution

The Obama administration has taken a harder line on fracking and it appears the industry as a whole is becoming subject to stricter regulation. One surprise here: The industry isn’t fighting this one. Unfortunately, greenhouse gases aren’t specifically addressed by the new standards, only toxic pollutants.

2. “California Takes the Lead With New Green Initiatives”
http://e360.yale.edu/feature/california_takes_the_lead_with_new_green_initiatives/2504/

Read up on all the amazing things California is doing as a leader in environmental protection and sustainability, and prepare to have your jaw drop. Compared to the rest of the U.S., it almost seems like a different country. They are well ahead of the game and hopefully the rest of the country quickly follows suit.

3. “Report: Ohio unprepared for climate change”
http://www.dispatch.com/content/blogs/science-environment/2012/04/water-report.html

Our beloved home state of Ohio, on the other hand, is a bit slow-moving when it comes to addressing the environment, specifically climate-change induced water shortages. From the report: “Ohio could lose as much as $27 billion in GDP and 167,000 jobs from reduced water availability.”

Also, check out a look into Ohio University’s resource consumption over the past few years, as well as a look at how OU is leading Midwest campuses in the switch from coal to natural gas.
The ‘green’ screen
OU helps lead Midwest campuses Beyond Coal 

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